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April 24th Activity Bundle

A PARADE OF ANIMALS BY ROGER PRIDDY

READ BY KATLYN FROM THE INFANT ROOM


INFANT STICKY BALL ACTIVITY

sticky ball

Here’s a great fine motor activity to keep your infant busy!

VELS:

PLAY AND EXPLORATION 

Goal 1: Children engage in play to understand the world around them.

  1. Experiment with object to see how it reacts to different actions (e.g. bang, shake and roll pinecone)

PROBLEM SOLVING 

Goal 1: Children display an interest in novel situations and demonstrate flexibility, creativity and innovation in solving challenging tasks.

  1. Make discoveries about self, others, and the environment through a variety of multi-sensory/motor interactions

MOTOR DEVELOPMENT AND COORDINATION

Goal 2: Children develop strength, eye-hand coordination, and control of their small or fine motor muscles.

  1. Transfer objects from one hand to another

  2. Use both hands to hold, reach for and let go of objects

  3. Coordinate movements using eyes and hands (e.g., bring hands together, stack rings)

THE HOUSE AT POOH CORNER BY A.A. MILNE

“In Which Tigger Comes to the Forest and Has Breakfast”

read by Melissa from the Blue Preschool

Children make connections and build mental imagery when they listen to stories.   Please join in listening to Melissa’s audio reading of a Winnie the Pooh story. Encourage your children to make pictures in their mind (mental images) while listening.

Let’s have a book picnic turned home library!

stage book picnic

Older Toddler book picnic.


Many of us miss going to the library because the Fletcher Free Library is such a valuable resource in our community! They have provided classrooms with memberships as outreach. So many of your children experience the library through classroom visits to read, check out books and participate in enrichment events.  

Book Picnic is a frequent way we explore books in the infant and toddler rooms at BCS.  It is meant to give children the opportunity to peruse books and make choices for reading either solo, with friends or adults.  Preschoolers experience book picnics as a way to bring literature outside and offer a calming option on the playground.

Book picnic with babies OUTSIDE!


How to have a Book Picnic:

  1. Spread a blanket out  across the floor or in the yard

  2. Place multiple favorite books on the blanket 

  3. Invite children to peruse the books and make choices about which to read

  4. Ask if they would like you to read the book or if they want to read it independently

  5. Read chosen book with your child or sit with your child and read materials of your choice while they read independently

Hint:  This activity is very calming and it is beneficial for children to read next to reading family members if they choose to read independently.

MN book pic

Two friends share a book together during a book picnic in the Younger Toddler room.


This is what it might look like at home, a book picnic with Melissa’s dog, Fern:

A book picnic can turn into a home library by displaying books on different surfaces in various ways around a room to mimic the ways children experience books displayed during a library visit.  This was a frequent after nap exploration in the toddler rooms when Melissa was a toddler teacher.

Home library was created as the children slept by displaying books on all available surfaces so that as they awoke from nap, they were in the library surrounded by books. We sat and listened to audio books or read books on each others’ mats as children woke slowly.  There is magic in having books to peruse and in waking up in the midst of books.  

table books

It is such a  lovely way to honor and celebrate our library when we are unable to go to the library.

Children benefit from reading books as a support to their development and to promote a love of learning:

  1. Books support language development as they expose children to written and oral language; they see the words in books and learn that words can be read when they hear others read to them.

  2. Books promote cognitive development by fostering the curiosity and exploration of questions that arise while experiencing books.

  3. Books support children’s observation skills and mental thought processes.

Some questions you can ask your child when you read books or while they read books:

  1. What do you notice in the illustrations?

  2. What just happened in the story?  Did you expect it? 

  3.  What do you think will happen next?

  4. How do you think the characters are feeling?

Hint:  When reading with younger children, (preverbal or newly verbal children) state your observations related to the above questions: “I notice that… [character] just got into a boat.” “I was surprised that…” “It seems that… [character] is feeling worried or anxious.”

VELS: Communications and Expression Literacy  Development; 1:1 Engaging with Literature Children develop “book language” and demonstrate comprehension.


FREIGHT TRAIN BY DONALD CREWS

READ BY KATLYN

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