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DOCUMENTATION – The Importance in Early Ed Classrooms

Katlyn Bullis

All teachers at the Burlington Children’s Space are researchers and documenters. We are collecting as much information as possible to paint a picture of progress and outcomes. Documenting individual growth requires a great deal of research, as the teacher must observe each child in a variety of areas of development over a substantial length of time. Only then can the teacher create a documentation piece that tells an accurate story about each child. {Young Children, 2008}.

A philosophy that we value at BCS is the Reggio Emilia pedagogical approach, with this comes the recognition of the “hundred languages” of children. This is the idea that children innately have a vast array of ways to communicate, explore and learn. Loris Malaguzzi developed a philosophy for early childhood education which is centered around children’s interests. The “hundred languages” refers to the ways in which children learn and choose to investigate learning experiences, each having their individual process. Read this poem below for some knowledge within Malaguzzi’s approach.

It is within our documentation that we can advocate for children and share with them the knowledge that they bring to others and their world. Giving meaning to their work and choices that they make boost their self awareness and confidence in seeing that we believe in them and that their learning is valued. Read this poem below for some knowledge into Malaguzzi’s approach:

It is within our documentation that we can advocate for children and share with them the knowledge that they bring to others and their world. Giving meaning to their work and choices that they make boost their self awareness and confidence in seeing that we believe in them and that their learning is valued.

As teachers, it is our responsibility to hold ourselves accountable for the learning and growth of children. We provide a realm of diverse opportunities to accommodate all skills and progress of learning. Here are some of the children’s experiences captured throughout the years:

INFANT/BABY CLASSROOM (6 weeks – 1.5 years)

YOUNG TODDLER CLASSROOM (1 year – 2.5 years)

OLD TODDLER CLASSROOM (2.5 years – 3.5 years)

PRESCHOOL (3.5 – 5 years)

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