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May 27th Activity Bundle

CHALK PAINTING

BY JO

This DIY sidewalk paint is a washable colored paint that you can use to be creative on sidewalks and driveways!

Ingredients:


Cornstarch


Water


Liquid Food Coloring

Instructions:

  1. Mix equal parts cornstarch and water and whisk smooth.

  2. Divide mixture into cups or muffin tin. Use one drop of food coloring to color individual containers

  3. Once mixed together, feel free to use paint brushes, sponges, or foam brushes to paint onto sidewalks.


ABC: AN AMAZING ALPHABET BOOK BY DR. SEUSS

READ BY LAUREN B.

IMPORTANCE OF TURN TAKING IN SOCIAL EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

BY KATLYN AND MOLLY

TURNS

Taking turns is such an important part of your child’s development. It is their way of successfully entering play with their peers.  Allowing them to share a sense of belonging and collaboration with others.  

Some strategies to try to teach your child how to take turns: 

Start by introducing the idea of waiting for a turn during play. You can model this by asking for turns or encouraging your child to ask for a turn when wanting something that you currently have.  This helps to support social emotional development while balancing the rights of self and others in their community. 

Help your child by teaching them to wait.  Young children are still developing their sense of time.  Emphasize the word “wait” while continuing to use the object for a few seconds or even minutes after and then saying something like “OK it is your turn now, I am all done” Try to emphasize the word “turn” during daily routines at home. This can be done using words or signs. 

Sign for Turn – Thumb and Index Finger turning back and forth.


Sign for Wait – Both hands palms facing your own body and wiggle.


Here are a few activities that you can play with your child to encourage turn taking:

Peek-a-Boo:

One of the simplest ways you can begin to teach your toddler the concept of taking turns and sharing is with a game of peek-a-boo. When you take a turn covering your eyes, face, or head (doing so with a fabric napkin or a see-through scarf) your child giggles, smiles and laughs, this encourages them to take the next turn.  Use language like “It’s your turn to hide” while using the “turn” sign.  If the child is eager and attempts to take the object from you, remind them to “wait” with the sign too!

Block Building:

Being a role model “playmate” for your child is more than fun and games. It provides an opportunity for your toddler to see the benefit of sharing and taking turns with their friends and/or siblings.  Stacking blocks teaches sharing and also introduces the concept that sometimes activities are more fun when we share them with others.

Music Making

Put on some of your child’s favorite music and take turns playing along on your homemade instruments (or traditional ones).  Take out just one instrument and demonstrate how to play it. Then say “Do you want to take a turn?” while using the sign.  Once again, gently encourage your child to wait, rather than grabbing the instrument from your hands. Continue taking turns, and introduce a new instrument after every couple of turns to keep your child’s interest in the activity.

Vermont Early Learning Standards (VELS):

SOCIAL RULES OF LANGUAGE 

Goal 1: Young children initiate and maintain conversations with others while developing knowledge and use of the social rules of language.



Initiate and engage in simple turn taking interactions with others by using gestures, vocalizations, or facial expressions


Respond differently to different tones of voice and facial expressions


Use appropriate eye contact and engage in joint attention

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